Portland Chinatown Museum will remain closed to support community efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Public Programs

Lectures & Presentations
Ongoing

Diana Lo Mei Hing in Conversation with Horatio Law

January 18, 2020

An abstract watercolor and mixed media painter, photographer, and poet, Diana Lo Mei Hing speaks with Horatio Law about her family history, her art, and the experience of having her first solo Pacific Northwest exhibition at the Portland Chinatown Museum.


Making Art, Daoism, and Miles Davis - Artist Talk and Reception

Diana Lo Mei Hing
January 9, 2020


Model Minority: Do the Math - Film Screening and Discussion

Dr. Darby Li Po Price
October 24, 2019 

The award winning 2013 PBS documentary, Model Minority: Do the Math, by Teja Arboleda and Darby Li Po Price explores how the model minority myth of Asian Americans as overachievers is a contradictory stereotype, and how it impacts Asian Americans across diverse backgrounds abilities, goals, viewpoints, and needs.


Early Chinese Women in Portland

Dr. Chuimei Ho
June 20, 2019 

"Merchants’ Wives, Prostitutes, and Identities In Between: Early Chinese Women in Portland," an illustrated lecture from curator and author Chuimei Ho, exploring the lives of Chinese women in Portland’s early years.


Last Boat Out of Shanghai: Author Helen Zia in Conversation with Putsata Reang

May 29, 2019 

A reading of her bestselling book, Last Boat Out of Shanghai, by nationally acclaimed writer, journalist, and activist Helen Zia, is followed by a conversation with writer Putsata Reang.








Artifacts of Chinese Labor in the Far West

Robert Boyd
April 23, 2019 

An up close and hands-on look at the spectrum of work and workers who came to Gum San (Gold Mountain) seeking opportunity, and in the process, shaped the economy and infrastructure of the region. During his tenure at the High Desert Museum, Boyd curated the groundbreaking exhibition, Gum San - Land of the Golden Mountain, and is an expert in the material culture of early workers in the West.


Massacred for Gold 

R. Gregory Nokes
March 31, 2019 

In 1887, in Oregon’s remote Hells Canyon, an improbable gang of horse thieves and schoolboys robbed and murdered as many as 34 Chinese gold miners in the worst of the many crimes committed by whites against Chinese immigrants in the 19th century American West.  From his recent book, Journalist R. Gregory Nokes details this chilling crime, its subsequent cover up, and the presence of Chinese workers in the interior Pacific Northwest in the late-nineteenth century.


Tin Cans and Mining Pans

Chelsea Rose
February 28, 2019 

“Tin Cans and Mining Pans: What Archaeology is Teaching us about the Early Chinese Diaspora,” a talk from Chelsea Rose about the recent archaeological findings from Chinese immigrant sites across the state; including the excavation of a home burned in the fall of 1888, work camps associated with the construction of the Oregon and California Railroad, the John Day Chinatown, and late-19th to early 20th century mining in the Blue Mountains.


Arts & Activism in the Asian American Community

Roberta Wong and Dr. Jennifer Fang
October 25, 2018

A discussion with artist Roberta Wong and historian Dr. Jennifer Fang about the intersections of art and activism in Asian American communities.


Building Tradition: Defining Chinatown

Dr. Marie Wong
September 13, 2018 

Dr. Marie R. Wong, the author of Sweetcakes, Long Journey about Portland's Historic Chinatowns, talks about her new book from Chin Music Press, Building Tradition: Pan-Asian Seattle and Life in the Residential Hotels.  


Meet the Artists: Ellen George and Lynn Yarne

October 18, 2018 

A discussion with artists Ellen George and Lynn Yarne about their installations in Descendent Threads.